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  • STANFORD LAW SCHOOL, JD, 2009 

    • ​Case studies on community economic development, immigration, social entrepreneurship, education nonprofits, ADA, and History of American law 

    • Represented Stanford Law School before legal, business, and government leaders in China.

    • Formed deep relationships with current national progressive leaders

  • TSINGHUA UNIVERSITY | Mandarin Language Fellow | Beijing, China                   2005 – 2006]

  • STANFORD UNIVERSITY, BA in INTERNATIONAL ​RELATIONS, HONORS IN ETHICS, 2005

    • ​Coursework on “Religion and Social Justice: MLK+Rabbi A.J. Heschel”

    • Studied abroad in Seville, Spain 

    • Assistant editor at that’s Beijing magazine in China.    

StanfordStudying.jpg

Photo Description: "Sporting" world-famous Stanford Studying t-shirts with friends from freshman year

EDUCATION

STANFORD UNIVERSITY, BA in INTERNATIONAL ​RELATIONS, HONORS IN ETHICS, 2005​

 

During senior year of high school, we were allowed to make short videos for our graduation ceremony.  In my video, I claimed that I had been recruited to play offensive line on Stanford’s football team.  If you’ve met me in person, you’ll know that I am not now, nor have I ever been, qualified physically or athletically to play such a position.

 

However, I did major in International Relations, write an honors Ethics thesis on the use of force against terrorists, study Mandarin (including as a language fellow in Beijing), study abroad in Seville, Spain (thanks to SARS), mentor an 8th grade student who had recently immigrated from India, and manage to graduate just in time to see Steve Jobs’ commencement speech on a very hot day in 2005.  

Photo Description: Stretching my student budget at one of Beijing's many "Xiao Chi" cafes

Post-College: TSINGHUA UNIVERSITY | Mandarin Language Fellow | Beijing, China               

After graduating, over the summer I self-studied for the LSAT, which I took hours before flying to Beijing.  There, I studied intensive Mandarin at TsingHua University.  On the street and in taxis, locals constantly mistook me for a “Xin Jiang Ren” (aka Uyghur).  With my roommate, I co-wrote a comedy sketch in Mandarin in which I played an American cowboy trying to buy tea at a store named "ChaBuDuo” (which, depending on the tones, means “not far off” or “not much tea”).  At “English Corner”, where I frequently volunteered, anyone from the public could ask us questions to practice their English.  My favorites ranged from “Why do you think people blow themselves up” [during the War on Terror] to “Why is Stanford’s basketball team so bad this year?”, asked in succession on the same night by two different students.

Photo Description: Being hoisted by "Open-Bar Mitzvah Party" attendees, Stanford Law School

Photo Description: Celebrating the end of my stint as Mandarin translator to fellow law students (pictured) at the Beijing Olympics

STANFORD LAW SCHOOL, JD, 2009​

I won’t bore you with as many details here, as you’ll find more under my "Experiences" tabs.  But, I will share that one of my early experiences with philanthropy involved raising money for the first “Open-Bar Mitzvah Party,” which became an annual signature event.  This was also one of my first experiences with communications, as I recruited various law professors to share their own extremely embarrassing photos (circa age 13), which friends and I posted on flyers throughout the school to advertise the event.  I also recruited two friends to kindly serve as “dance motivators” at the party — on a pro bono basis, of course.  

Photo Description: Celebrating the end of my formal education, and milestone along my continuing lifelong educational journey, at Stanford Law School graduation

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